Such innovations could help people lose weight and eat more healthily without even realising it
— WIRED UK
While the tangible aspects of deliciousness reside in the molecular and physical properties of foodstuffs, evidence such as this brings additional insights into the question of how to make food more enjoyable, in the restaurant scene, and in everyday life
— UNIVERSITY OF OXFORD
The next time you’re feasting on a delicious meal consider the idea that there may be another variable at play making it extra tasty
— TIME
Designer Andreas Fabian, who has a PhD on spoons, has his sights set on even higher levels of gastronomic indulgence
— THE GUARDIAN
From chocolate mousse made with mashed up bees to innovative bowls and spoons that will make us eat more healthily [Michel] is hacking food in remarkable ways
— WIRED UK
Well, thank God the great minds of our century are figuring out how to make our food taste better. Chefs can only do so much
— VICE MUNCHIES

Selected Press

WIRED UK
 

The Future of Food, February 2015

 

ART AUREA
 

On eating and drinking, July 2015

 

WIRED UK Design
 

Heavier Cutlery Makes Food Taste Better, July 2015

 

MUNCHIES
 

Food tastes Better if you use Heavy Forks and Knives, July 2015 

 

TIME Health 
 

A Heavier Fork and Knife Might Make Your Next Meal More EnjoyableJuly 2015

 

THE GUARDIAN Art and Design
 

Spoon me: how cutlery design can blow your tastebuds away, January 2015

 

OXFORD UNIVERSITY NEWS
 

Heavy cutlery 'enhances the enjoyment of food, July 2015

 


Exhibitions

"What drives your desires for the foods you love? Is it the colour of your spoon, the food your mum ate while pregnant, the trillions of bacteria that dine with you, or the little known ‘second brain’ in your gut? From the flavours you learned to love in the womb, to the very next bite you take, your appetite has been shaped by food. Through personal stories, fascinating objects and cutting-edge science and technology, explore how food affects your body, brain and eating habits". Text and Photo by the Science Museum, London

"What drives your desires for the foods you love? Is it the colour of your spoon, the food your mum ate while pregnant, the trillions of bacteria that dine with you, or the little known ‘second brain’ in your gut? From the flavours you learned to love in the womb, to the very next bite you take, your appetite has been shaped by food. Through personal stories, fascinating objects and cutting-edge science and technology, explore how food affects your body, brain and eating habits".
Text and Photo by the Science Museum, London

Touch Hunger prototypes on display in 'Cravings' exhibition at the Science Museum, London

February 2014 - May 2016